3 Great Options For Hanging Drapes In Arched Windows


Arched (or radius) windows can provide flare and drama that other styles of windows can rarely match. These windows can enhance the exterior appearance of your home while making the rooms in your home feel airy and full of natural light. Whether your arched windows are part of a classic or more contemporary design, there's no denying their appeal.

Of course, arched windows also present a few difficulties. In particular, selecting window treatments for an arched window can be more challenging than with traditional styles. However, it's also an opportunity that allows you to express yourself and your design goals. Let these three great options provide some inspiration if you're trying to decide how to use drapes with your home's arched windows.

1. High, Straight Ceiling Rods

The most straightforward option for treating an arched window is to install a straight curtain rod along the ceiling above the top of the window. This style provides the most traditional look, and taller panels will help make your room look larger and more dramatic. From a practical standpoint, this approach also lets you fully control how much light enters your room.

This option has no significant downsides, but there may be some constraints. For example, the ceiling slope may prevent you from installing a straight rod above the top of the arch. If your home has windows like this, taking this approach may not be feasible. Limited space to the left or right of the window can also create a crowded look or force you to block some sunlight from the window.

2. Head Curtain Rods

The head is the horizontal bar that runs across the "square" part of an arched window. If you can't or don't want to install a curtain rod above your window, another option is to install your curtain rod across the head. This option can be attractive, although it's important to remember that closing the curtains won't block the light from the transom (the arched upper window).

A head curtain road makes the most sense in rooms with very high ceilings and tall windows. On shorter windows, the head may be relatively close to eye level, which can potentially be unattractive. However, it's worth considering this option for large rooms where full light control is unnecessary.

3. Arched Rods

Arched rods conform to the shape of the upper part of the window, allowing you to install drapes that match the shape of your windows. This option can be appealing for smaller rooms, such as bathrooms, where there's not enough space for open drapes to sit to the sides of the window frame. Of course, the downside is that you always block a substantial amount of light from the window.

While these three options should get you started, there are plenty of ways to use drapes to treat arched windows. By thinking about the specific look you're trying to achieve, you'll be sure to find a perfect solution for your home. To learn more about indoor drapes, talk to a company like Miniblinds & More - Window Fashions

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Understanding Home Decor Basics

When I first purchased a home, I really had no idea what I was getting into. I thought that it would be fun and easy to make my home gorgeous, but I quickly realized that decorating was going to be a lot more difficult than I originally suspected. It was challenging to know what to add and what to leave out, and before I knew it, my place was looking a little cluttered. I started focusing on understanding the home decor basics, and although I am far from being a professional, my place not looks presentable. This blog is all about understanding and applying home decorating basics.

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